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Five ways to justify your expensive art collection

Whether you collect art as an investment, for decorative purposes, or just ‘because’, there is likely to be some emotion associated with the pieces in your collection. So why do we all love our art so much and subsequently attach such significant value to it?

Art is at the heart of our existence

Every culture in the world features art of some sort; whether we are creating art on our bodies or in the environment around us. From very young children we have been expressing ourselves through drawing, sculpting, painting, photography, printing, fabrics, new media or performing arts. It is hardly surprising therefore that we identify with art on such an innate and primitive level as adults.

A picture tells a thousand words

Just as writers have documented history throughout the ages, so too have artists. Through their accurate (and sometimes not so accurate!) representations of their era, we are able to glean invaluable glimpses of bygone architecture, fashions, landscapes, social nuances, trends, and cultural beliefs.

Through art, we can communicate

Whether we’re conveying a message through the creation of art, or by a choice to commission, acquire or display a particular piece, art is undoubtedly a way to communicate. From the style and content of the piece, to its price tag and the reaction it provokes, art is laden with messages that often transcend generations.

Art nurtures and heals our souls

When viewing art in a therapeutic sense, it can provide an immense emotional release and unlock thoughts, feelings and memories that could otherwise remain hidden. When engaged in the creation of art, its power can be equally curative, soothing, inspirational and enriching – perhaps because it releases our childlike instincts and provides much-needed comfort and escapism.

United by art, divided by opinion

Art has a fascinating way of both uniting and dividing us as a society, when we come together in mass critique. Our opinions may differ wildly – whether expressed by many across decades or shared between two during a personal exchange in a gallery – but we are united by the focus of our debate. From Mona Lisa’s smile to The Scream’s, er, scream, we – like the artists themselves – are moved from mere observation to passionate expression. And that, ultimately, is why we love art: it moves us. And you can’t put a price on that.

In the Victor magazine we catch up with Jonathan Green, CEO of Bond Street’s Richard Green, one of the world’s leading art dealerships. He reveals what moved collectors at this year’s TEFAF international art and crafts fair. Grab the sneak preview supplement in Saturday’s Financial Times.


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